Prelude to the Epic of Gilgamesh

So I've hit a major milestone in my reading of Ancient Literature, in that I've cracked open the Epic of Gilgamesh. I haven't really started on the text proper because I'm reading the Penguin classics edition, and there are copious notes at the beginning about how the tablets were found, and some of the context …

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In Which it is Learned That Sumerian Kings Thought Very Highly of Themselves Part III (Sumerian Praise Poetry)

I got a little tired of having a bunch of posts with the same title, so I went ahead and finished what I was reading. I went through about three other dynasties in the Sumerian/Akkadian/Babylonian citystates, all the way up to contemporaries of Hammurabi. (I was beginning to wonder when he'd show up.) The trend …

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More Akkadian Origins and Curses

So this week we're back to the Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature and we've got a couple more items on offer today. One of them being "Sargon and Ur-Zababa" and the other being another Naram-Sin story called "The Curse of Agade." In "Sargon and Ur-Zababa we find another aspect of Sargon's origin story which …

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The Tale of Naram-Sin

My reading of the Westenholtz book continues, and so far I have finished a series of letters alleged to have been written by Sargon, though really they seem more like a list of things than what we might think of as a letter, and after finishing that part of the book dealing with tablets about …

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The Sargon Legend Continues

I'm about a third of the way through Joan Westenholtz's book "Legends of the Kings of Akkad" and the tablets I'm reading seem to be largely of Babylonion origin though speaking about Sargon's military conquests. So far, for some reason, he seemed like he was really interested in the mountain of cedars. Other than that, …

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